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AZTEC RECIPES
Hello Readers, I am called "Schon" because my name is difficult to say/pronounced. I am of "Mexikah" descent AKA: "Aztecan" and I'd like to share some of my people's recipes for  your enjoyment here they are :
 
Recipes:

Etl Tomal (Bean tamales)

   

Filling:

   

1

lb

dried beans

1

lg

green banana pepper

1

dried

anchio pepper

1/2 to 1

small

jalapeno pepper

1

whole

onion

1/2

t

salt

     

Soak beans overnight and cook until tender. Drain off most of the water. Add onion and peppers cook until tender. Drain off the rest of the water and mash. Prepare the tamale while this is warm, as it is hard to work with cold.     Tomal dough: (this is a modern tamale dough recipe, it works better with the lard)

1 1/3

c

lard

8

c

mesa harina (tortilla flour)

6

c

warm water or broth

2/3

c

melted lard

33

lrg

dried corn husks, softened

     

Whip 1 1/3 c lard until fluffy. Beat in flour and water, alternating each. Beat in melted lard.    To assemble tomal: Place approximately 2 tbs of dough in the center of the tamale and flatten. Place the same amount of filling on the dough and cover with 1 tbs of dough. Fold husks over like an envelope and tie with string (the Aztecs used a piece of corn husk). Steam tamales for 1 hour or until dough pulls away from the husk.

 

Uexolotl veiltexcalli (Turkey with tortillas)

2

c

roast turkey, shredded

1

med

onion

1/2

lg

green pepper

1/2

t

ground, dried chili

1/4

c

turkey broth

1/2

t

salt

                 Large corn tortillas                                                                                 Cook turkey, vegetables, broth and seasonings in a sauce pan until the vegetables are tender. Wrap a few tablespoons of filling into each tortilla and serve.

 

Xictomatlimolli Red tomato sauce (hot)

4

lg

red tomatoes

2

 

tomatillos (green tomatoes)

1

med

onion

2

 

jalapeno peppers

1

 

pablano pepper

1/2

tsp

salt

Chop all ingredients very fine, especially the hot peppers. Simmer over low flame until reduced and thick.

 

Texochilimolli Green pepper sauce (mild)

2

lg

red tomatoes

1/4

c

cilantro

1/2

 

jalapeno pepper

1

med

onion

1/2

 

pablano pepper

1

lg

green bell pepper

1/2

tsp

salt

Finely chop all ingredients and serve fresh.

 

Chocolatl Chocolate drink

1

c

lukewarm water

1/4

c

natural cocoa*

2

tbs

honey

1/2

tsp

vanilla extract

Mix together and beat for several seconds in an electric blender or by hand. Serve in small cups. (The honey and vanilla can be omitted and chili powder can be added.)* I use Natural Cocoa Powder from Penzy’s Spice. It is not Dutch processed and still retains all of the fat found in the bean.

WANT MORE RECIPES?

CLICK HERE:  >>>  http://chilemasters.tripod.com/tamales.html

 

Enter content here

maizhuic.jpg

CORN
Corn as you well know is our "Manna" from the sky.
AUTHOR'S NARATIVE:
MAIZE as it is called.
Maize, or "corn," a staple of life in both Central and South, North America Indigenous Peoples, also played a major religious and ritual role in the lives of these ancient peoples.  This narative looks at Mexican Natives mythologies surrounding this sacred food; you as a reader will also look at the troubled future of maize in our own time. It has gone various mutations in recent years...
Many Native Peoples have different Legends of CORN, the Aztec and other descendants of the Aztecs continue to tell the stories of how the Corn was born:
Huichol Maize Mother and her Five Daughters
Mexico, Yesterday an Now
This is a Huichol myth about the origins of maize. 
 ...The Mother of Maize changed her dove appearance to a human one; She introduced to the young man her 5 daughters, who symbolize the five maize sacred colors: white, red, yellow, spotted and blue. As the young man was hungry The Mother of Maize gave him a kettle filled with tortillas and a pot filled with atole; he didn't belive that those could satiate his hunger, but the tortillas and atole were renewed magicaly, in a way that he couldn't finish them.  The Mother of Maize asked him to choose one of her daughters and he took the Girl of Blue Maize, the most beautiful  and sacred of them all...
From CORN comes many foods. It seems to have a Spiritual uplifting. When the Israelites were told to get out of Egypt and went wondering into the wilderness with Moses, they almost starved. But God sent them "MANNA" and they ate it. CORN is the "MANNA" of the Indigenous Peoples also. 
    This legend talks about the influence of the molecules that give its characteristic color to maize grains) in maize selection. When it's said that the Mother of Maize finds a huichol young man, takes him to her home, offers him in marriage her daughters where each one of them represents a color, it's indicating the main colors of maize grains from where the selection will be perfromed, thus she has a White Daughter, another Red, one Yellow, a Spotted and a Blue one, the huichol chooses the Girl of Blue Maize who is the most beautiful and most sacred. 
    During this narration it can be glimpsed the importance conceded to its genetics structure so in this moment the main character chooses the Girl of blue Maize, whose aleurone shows a high rise in the production of this pigments, in this way he leaves the other girls that have the different colors off , spotted or red - it means that only the Girl of Blue Maize had the genetic contents necessary to satisfy the needs of the Huichol people (Blue tortillas are more delicious !... 
    Now this  concludes the CORN  Legend  of the Huichol People, descendants of the Proud Lords of the Aztec People ( Mecheekahs ). 
 .